Blog

How To Fold A Full Suit So It Won’t Wrinkle

How To Fold A Full Suit So It Won’t Wrinkle

Guys (and ladies who have guys in their lives who need to look nice from time to time), pay attention to this lifehack. Here’s how to fold a suit so that it won’t wrinkle.

Read more

The Play That Changed the Super Bowl

The Play That Changed the Super Bowl

The Falcons had a golden opportunity to put Super Bowl LI away. Instead, Dont’a Hightower made history.

Read more

Go Ahead, Write a Check for Your Coffee, I’ve Got All Day

Go Ahead, Write a Check for Your Coffee, I’ve Got All Day

Despite the relentless march of electronic payments and debit cards, Americans still write 17 billion or so, infuriating everyone in line, especially baffled millennials

Read more

Make Learning a Lifelong Habit

Make Learning a Lifelong Habit

I recently worked my way through Edmund Morris’s first two Teddy Roosevelt biographies, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt and Theodore Rex. Roosevelt wasn’t without flaws, but he was by nearly all accounts fascinating and intellectually voracious. He published his first book, The Naval War of 1812, at 23 and continued to write on everything from conservation to politics and biography. According to Morris, at certain periods he was rumored to read a book a day, and all this reading and writing arguably made him both charismatic and uniquely equipped to engage the host of topics he did as president: national conservation efforts, naval expansion, trust regulation, and a variety of others.

Read more

Customer Loyalty Is Overrated

Customer Loyalty Is Overrated

Marketers spend a lot of time—and money—trying to delight consumers with ever-fresher, ever-more-appealing products. But their customers, it turns out, make most purchase decisions almost automatically. They look for what’s familiar and easy to buy. This package explores that idea and the science behind it, offers a counterpoint, and includes conversations with the cochairman of the LEGO Brand Group and the chairman of Intuit.

Read more

How Snapchat Is Shaping Social Media

How Snapchat Is Shaping Social Media

Snap, the company that runs the social media service Snapchat, is headed for a blockbuster initial public offering of stock in 2017. Here is how Snap got to this point…

Read more

Sold! Historic Items at Auction

Sold! Historic Items at Auction

To celebrate Christie’s International’s 250th anniversary, a new book, “Going Once” (Phaidon, $59.95), showcases 250 notable sales from the auction house. The collection includes blockbuster items (such as a Francis Bacon triptych that sold for $142 million in 2013) as well as interesting and unusual objects, from books to wine to fashion. What they all have in common, the introduction notes, is that “someone wanted them badly enough to put up a fight.”

Read more

The Top Selfie-Worthy Museum Shows of 2017

The Top Selfie-Worthy Museum Shows of 2017

From the kaleidoscopic works of Takashi Murakami to Yayoi Kusama’s infinity mirrored rooms, art exhibits on social media this year will be as inescapable as cat videos. To draw visitors and grab global attention, museums and galleries are mounting shows with strong digital potential. Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat are turning exhibits into pop-culture experiences. Shows with multi-sensory elements or artist-created interactive environments that shine in selfies are at a premium.

Read more

Survey: People’s Trust Has Declined in Business, Media, Government, and NGOs

Survey: People’s Trust Has Declined in Business, Media, Government, and NGOs

We are living in an era of backlash against authority. So far, government and the media have borne the brunt of populist anger, while businesses have remained above the fray. Past protest movements such as Occupy Wall Street notwithstanding, mass outrage has yet to be directed squarely at the business elite. But there are signs that this is changing.

Read more

Research: Cracking a Joke at Work Can Make You Seem More Competent

Research: Cracking a Joke at Work Can Make You Seem More Competent

As a society, we often make judgments about people based on small snippets of their behavior. For example, we may judge a person’s confidence, competence, and status on the success of a single joke. Telling a joke to an unfamiliar audience is risky — Will they laugh? Will they be offended? Even if they laugh, will they really think the joke is funny?

Read more
Page 30 of 33« First...1020...2829303132...Last »